Telephone Improvement Project – Year 2 Ongoing Assessment of Refractive Surgery Providers

Telephone Improvement Project – Year 2 Ongoing Assessment of Refractive Surgery Providers

Refractive surgeons and their staff face the ongoing challenge of successfully attracting consumers to learn more about their services. Increasingly, providers are becoming aware of the high cost of marketing promotion and the desire to carefully handle each and every inquiry, whether via phone, internet, or in person…

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You’re Wasting Your Time – Increasing Efficiency In The Refractive Practice

You’re Wasting Your Time - Increasing efficiency in the refractive practice.

Most of what has been written on refractive surgery has focused on making the practice (surgeon, staff, marketing) more effective. Given the size of refractive surgery’s opportunity and the relatively low penetration thus far relative to the market’s potential, focusing on effectiveness makes sense. That is, we need to explore ways to make refractive surgery more attractive to more of the population. Of equal value to a practice’s effectiveness is the concept of practice efficiency…

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Team-Building for Success

Team-Building for SuccessJust like in sports, success in refractive surgery depends on the strength of your team.

Over the years, I have had the pleasure of working closely with a number of refractive practices. It’s always a privilege to get a look inside the practice and learn what issues are hindering its success. Beyond the numbers and behind the programs are the people—whether called staff, employees, or team members—upon whom the surgeon and administrator count to get the work done day in and day out…

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Barriers to Patient Acceptance

Barriers to Patient AcceptanceWe’re managing the wrong issue.

Two emotions that drive human behavior are greed and fear. When it comes to LASIK, the factors that drive patient decision-making can also be boiled down to two: price and fear. Over the past 20 months, the industry has been obsessed with trying to manage the price issue: “If I drop my price, won’t more people come to have LASIK?”“How does she make money offering LASIK at such allow price?” “His volume is tanking because his fees are so high. ” You recognize these hallway discussions at shows and meetings. It appears we’ve been discussing the wrong issue. Can you imagine if those same hallway conversations were sprinkled with: “Wow! Did you see his new patient brochure? Incredible!” “That informed consent was the best I’ve ever witnessed. ” “His staff not only answers questions, they ask patients what they’re afraid of. ”These scenarios are probably difficult to imagine, mainly because eye care professionals are not trained in the art of communication. Some physicians and staff members have an ability to empathize, listen, and respond in away that builds trust and confidence in the prospective LASIK patient. Others simply do not have this ability and either delegate the task or ignore it altogether, hoping that the photocopied brochure and poorly produced “Dear Patient” letter will provide interested patients with valuable information. This has been proven a mistake…

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