PREMIUM PRACTICE TODAY: If I Knew Then What I Know Now

PREMIUM-PRACTICE-TODAY-If-I-Knew-Then-What-I-Know-Now

Hindsight is 20/happy.

The evolution of cataract and refractive surgery has taken surgeons on a wild ride over the past 25 years. Phacoemulsification revolutionized the removal of cataracts, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services eviscerated reimbursement…

 

Download the full blog

 


 

PREMIUM PRACTICE TODAY: Value-Added Services: Strengthen Your Rapport With Patients and Increase Your Revenue

PREMIUM-PRACTICE-TODAY-Value-Added-Services-Strengthen-Your-Rapport-With-Patients-and-Increase-Your-Revenue

Diversifying your practice only works if the strategy benefits your patients.

Diversifying your practice by incorporating value-added services can grow cataract and refractive surgery practices. The term value-added services refers to treatment options that complement the core service offerings of a company or medical practice but that are not vital to the core model of the enterprise. ..

 

Download the full blog

 


 

Speaking | Hawaiian Eye 2012

January 20, 2012 (Maui, HI)

 

Speaking | Hawaiian Eye 2012

Shareef’s Topic: “Marketing of Premium Cataract Surgery”

 

“As the field of ophthalmology constantly changes, so will Hawaiian Eye’s program content. In 2012, we’ll take your skills to the next level and explain how to incorporate cutting-edge procedures into your practice, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and combined cataract and glaucoma procedures. In addition to today’s hot topics, you’ll receive a comprehensive update on every aspect of your practice, including practice management, cataract/IOL technique and technology, cataract and refractive surgery complications, vitreoretinal issues, glaucoma, medical retina, ocular surface management, and refractive surgery.”

 

Target Audience

This program is specifically designed for the comprehensive ophthalmologist.
Full Details here: https://www.osnhawaiianeye.com/compOphth_agenda_fri.asp

Shareef Mahdavi’s Presentation at Hawaiian Eye 2012 Comprehensive Ophthalmologist Program

Date: Jan 20 2012  – Length | 7 minutes

[jwplayer config=”Powerpoints” mediaid=”2643″]


Book Shareef Mahdavi To Speak

PREMIUM PRACTICE TODAY: Building a Better Staff

PREMIUM-PRACTICE-TODAY-Building-a-Better-Staff

Employing the best staff has a lot to do with being the best employer.

Whether you are the head honcho and only physician in an up-and-coming cataract and refractive surgery practice or the CEO of an expansive ophthalmic ambulatory surgical center, hiring and keeping the best possible employees and coworkers areas integral to the success of your enterprise as attracting and retaining patients….

 

Download the full blog

 


 

Groupon for Surgery: A Bad Idea

Like many of you, I get a daily Groupon e-mail and will often take a look and see what special deal is being offered.   I admit to being intrigued by the upcoming Tomato Battle taking place in my town next weekend (modeled after the annual rite in Bunyol, Spain), but I’ll leave it up to a few thousand others to enjoy that event.

 

While I have serious reservations about the longevity of the business model (which were confirmed by Groupon’s recent financial reporting), this type of offering has struck a nerve with deal-seeking consumers whose spending patterns have been permanently altered by the economic battering of the past few years.  For consumers, Groupon (and its cousins on Living Social, Schwaggle and the hundreds of other deal sites) can be an enticing way to try or buy something for the first time.

 

For providers – and I am speaking directly to those of you who market your services – Groupon can be a risky proposition for the business.  There are countless examples in the media of the restaurant or bakery being overwhelmed by Groupon redeemers.  They simply didn’t have or plan capacity to meet demand.   In some ways, that’s a high quality problem for a business owner.     And for providers of annuity-type, non-surgical medical services, such as facial aesthetics (eg, Botox, teeth whitening), enticing a first-timer with a good deal makes sense.   What I am concerned for are those services that are in the “once-in-a-lifetime” category, such as LASIK.

 

Grouponing LASIK is a bad idea for one simple reason: No opportunity for repeat business!   You’ve given away the farm to someone who will only pay you one time.  And if it’s word-of-mouth you are hoping for, you need to recognize that what you are doing is stimulating consumers to talk about the great deal they got on LASIK instead of talking about the miraculous improvement in their vision.

 

I could dive right in to economic principles to support my assertion, but choose to limit them to their punch lines:

 

Don’t treat LASIK like a commoditized good.  There’s no “supply” of LASIK that risks becoming obsolete on the shelf  (such as last season’s trendy sweater) or spoiled (like those gourmet cupcakes).

 

Discounts don’t work to increase demand for LASIK.   Historical trends over 15 years demonstrate an inelasticity of demand, as decreasing prices have correlated with decreasing demand for the procedure.

For  a “one time” procedure, all a discount does is lure a person who has been actively considering the procedure; he or she would eventually have a sufficient trigger and pay the going rate.  The LASIK example illustrates how providers mistakenly believe they can attract the much larger market of spectacle and contact lens wearers; history has shown they aren’t motivated by low price.

 

My view is that demand for LASIK is going to improve steadily over the next few years.  See my commentary “Is LASIK Dead?” to learn more.  (Thank You Note: I’m gratified to see this was the most widely read article in the August 2011 issue of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today).

 

Doing a few hundred extra LASIK cases at half the price does little to boost the bottom line.   But it does a lot of damage to the long-term pricing integrity of that provider and continues to foster the myth that LASIK is a commodity and can be had for cheap.

 

In short, leave the grouponing to repeat-visit offerings where the goal is to stimulate a trial or sample purchase, and don’t undermine your long-term brand or market position by using groupon as a promotional tactic.  The risk of backfire is much higher than any possible short-term reward.